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How do we get a sense of the world around us without tangible experience? How do we know what fashion trends are current, or who won the broncos game while we were off at work? How do we see if the illustrious Kanye West or Donald Trump has said something that makes us pull our hair out in the last 24 hours? These answers lie in the way we obtain our news.

Growing up in a sports oriented family, ESPN was and is still today a monopoly of news exposure in my home. You can expect SportsCenter on the main living room TV while I’m on my couch doing homework or eating freeze pops by the gallon. I can honestly say that I decided to study journalism due to the impact Sports Television has had on me.

A huge advantage to ESPN is the fact that the cast and produces vary largely in demographic, views, and personality. When I turn on my flat screen at the end of a long day, I know that the information crammed in my eye holes via flashing lights, 2 minute clips containing 1000 sports plays, and theme music loud enough to make Hendrix roll over in his grave, will at least be truthful information I can trust.

High Definition SportsCenter Graphic - 2004

As for other news such as political and world news, I use what most people of my demographic use, Social Media.

I’m not going to sugar coat it, I am laying a fat egg in the cultural news department. Colin Kaepernick refusing to stand for the National Anthem during a football game is about how political my news intake gets. I know it’s my civic duty to have a better knowledge of the world around me, but with the access of Twitter , Instagram, and Facebook at my fingertips, I can skid by with the vague headlines of Trump and Hillary on my timeline.

Are these sources biased? ABSOLUTLEY! With a consumer demographic that swings heavy left-wing, my social media diet is filled with “Die Trump Die” and “Pot is Healthier than Alcohol”articles. Why do I use these sources for information? Convenience! Do I trust them? Well… probably not. What I can tell you is, whether I agree with the views and the  agenda set by the creator of these articles themselves, I can usually tip-toe through the BS to get an general idea of what is happening in the world around me.

I often talk only about sports with my roommates, but with the Presidential election coming up and the reality TV show that Trump and Hillary are piggy-backing on, conversations have started to drift in a political direction.

Although our sports conversations can often grow heated with much disagreement, I have noticed a common denominator among not only my roommates and I, but with my demographic in general concerning politics. It’s libertarianism.

With the maniac battle between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton being viewed on all social media platforms, young adults have began to shift in a direction that throws a middle finger to both candidates. I’ve seen more cohesion over the past few months of the race than in the beginning, and I would most likely credit the way social media has broadcasted the event.

“Liar or Psychopath, who will you vote for!?”, “Black Teen Killed by White Policeman”, “Quran Burned by 15 US Citizens” are the headlines shining from my phone every single day. For a young American, it feels like there isn’t much hope… but maybe its not the headlines I should be concerned with. Maybe it’s the source in which it comes from.

I drastically need to change my news diet to a more cultured viewership. As I become older, the leaders of this country, the laws passed, and social trends and events will only affect me more. It’s time for me and others like me to investigate truthful news sources, so that our knowledge can bring change, not our ignorance.